Dr Kumar Yogeeswaran

Dr Kumar Yogeeswaran


Senior Lecturer

Recent Media/Research Recognition

College of Science Emerging Researcher Award 2015 

Congratulations to Dr Kumar Yogeeswaran who has been awarded the College of Science Emerging Researcher Award for 2015. Kumar is an experimental social psychologist, with special expertise in the area of intergroup relations. Kumar carries out research on a range of issues associated with diversity, social identity and prejudice and is publishing in the top journals in these areas with collaborators from around the world.  In 2015 he was identified as an ‘Admired Scholar’ by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Diversity Committee, the leading professional society in the area, and is receiving a wide range of invitations from around the world of various kinds. Kumar is bringing the benefits of his work to bear at UC through his work with the University’s Māori Development Team to find research-based interventions that support Māori student success. Personal website with further research information and postgraduate supervision (20/10/15)

"Baxter - the friendly robot" - UC science research (TV3 News, 6/8/15)

University of Canterbury psychology researchers (Deak Helton and Kumar Yogeeswaran) are working with a revolutionary Baxter robot to understand human-robot interaction such as trust, cooperation, social behaviour, aggression and moral decision-making. (Read more)


PhD (University of Massachusetts – Amherst, USA)
MSc (University of Massachusetts – Amherst, USA)
BA with Honours (Ithaca College, USA)



Contact Details

Phone: +64 3 364 2964
Internal Phone: 6964

Email: kumar.yogeeswaran@canterbury.ac.nz

Postal address:
Department of Psychology
University of Canterbury
Private Bag 4800
New Zealand

Undergraduate Courses

PSYC 332: Social Psychology - Course Coordinator

Postgraduate Courses

PSYC 466: Special Topic: The Psychology of Inter-Group Relations - Course Coordinator

Research Interests

At the broadest level, my primary research lies in the realm of intergroup relations. This interest is fueled by the desire to understand how people’s membership in particular groups (e.g. ethnic, gender, or national groups) shape their attitudes, stereotypes, and behaviours toward others as well as their own self-conceptions. Much of my primary work examines the complexities and challenges of achieving national unity in societies comprised of diverse cultural groups. This research also explores the underlying psychological processes that may create intergroup conflict, while also identifying strategies that reduce intergroup conflict in the nation.

As a secondary interest, I have several programs of research that bridge interdisciplinary fields by applying social psychological science to other areas such as law, politics, communication, and robotics.

Personal website with further research information and postgraduate supervision

Publications and UC Research Profile